Justice Alito Reluctantly Gives First Update Since SCOTUS Leak


OPINION: This article contains commentary which may reflect the author's opinion


Over the weekend and through the week, pro-abortion activists occupied the streets, sidewalks, and yards of the homes of a number of Supreme Court justices – including Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Brett Kavanaugh – in protest over a leaked draft Supreme Court decision that, if adopted, would overturn the famous 1973 Roe v. Wade judgment that legalized abortion.

The group Ruth Sent Us staged demonstrations targeting justices’ homes on Wednesday.

Leftist death threats prompted officials to move Justice Alito and his family to an undisclosed location to keep them safe.

Fox News reported on “Pro-abortion protestors gathered outside of Chief Justice Roberts’ house Wednesday to protest the leaked draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade.”

Some, however, are noting that there is a federal law that prohibits protests like these that interfere with, obstruct or hinder court proceedings.

The protesters gathered outside the homes of conservative justices are being warned that they may be held accountable for an infraction not unlike the one for which some Capitol protesters were charged on Jan. 6, 2021. It is prohibited to attempt to intimidate judges into changing their judgments under 18 U.S.C. * 1507.

Even the left-leaning Washington Post picked up on the story.

Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. gave his first public speech since his draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade was leaked, despite continued protests outside his house by pro-abortion activists.

Alito spoke from a remote location seven miles from the Scalia School of Law at George Mason University on Thursday, expressing growing concerns for the safety of Supreme Court justices since Politico posted Alito’s draft opinion.

As reported by The Washington Post, Alito offered “a detailed examination of statutory textualism” before addressing the most pressing issue – Roe v. Wade and the troubling fallout since the leak.

As the evening came to a close, the final question was if the justices could still sit down for a meal together.

“I think it would just be really helpful for all of us to hear, personally, are you all doing okay in these very challenging times?…” asked the questioner.

Alito was hesitant to comment.

“This is a subject I told myself I wasn’t going to talk about today regarding, you know — given all the circumstances,” Alito responded.

Having paused for a moment, he continued.

“The court right now, we had our conference this morning, we’re doing our work,” he explained. “We’re taking new cases, we’re headed toward the end of the term, which is always a frenetic time as we get our opinions out.”

“So that’s where we are,” he stated plainly.

This was in stark contrast to the usual “we may disagree, but we’re all friendly and respectful” response such a question usually receives.

Activists had gathered outside the virtual speech at George Mason University. They shouted in unison, “Hey hey, ho ho, Alito has got to go! Hey hey, ho ho we must defend Roe!”

The Washington Post reported that thirty feet away, five counter-protesters were chanting: “Abortion is violence! Abortion is oppression!”

Activists have converged on the homes of conservative Supreme Court justices after the pro-abortion group Ruth Sent Us published the addresses of six members.

An opinion poll commissioned by the Trafalgar Group and Convention of States Action showed that a majority of Americans revolted against the blatant attempts at intimidation of the justices.

The Biden administration still has not condemned the illegal protests, instead, it has encouraged the law breakers to continue.

This survey, conducted May 6 to 8, found that 75.8% of voters felt that the demonstrators’ actions were unacceptable. 66.6% of Democrats and 86.5% of Republicans, as well as 75.1% of Independents, felt the same way.

Moreover, 52.3% of voters believed that Biden’s initial denial of condemning the protests outside the justices’ residence would encourage violence and illegality.

“These numbers make it clear that the Biden Administration’s refusal — both to forcefully condemn these illegal demonstrations and to enforce laws protecting Justices of the United States Supreme Court — is wildly unpopular with voters,” according to Convention of States Action President Mark Meckler. “Democrats are out of step with the vast majority of Americans, regardless of political party.”

It is prohibited to attempt to intimidate judges into changing their judgments under 18 U.S.C. * 1507.

According to the statute: “Whoever, with the intent of interfering with, obstructing, or impeding the administration of justice, or with the intent of influencing any judge, juror, witness, or court officer, in the discharge of his duty, pickets or parades in or near a building housing a court of the United States, or in or near a building or residence occupied or used by such judge, juror, witness, or court officer, or with such intent uses any sound-truck or similar device or resorts to any other demonstration in or near any such building or residence, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.”

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